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Village Dialogues in 3 Volumes: Christian Group talking about things that concern them, Farmer Littleworth, Thomas Newan, Mr Lovegood and others

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Farmer Littleworth

An extract from a chapter on the  Evils of the Slave Trade . Can it be proved that their natural under-standings are in a small degree inferior to our own ; are we from thence to infer, that we have a right to set them at variance among themselves, that we may kidnap, rob, and murder, as we like beasts.  We should  set an example to all Europe, by being  he  first and  principal transgressors, that we may avail ourselves annually of more than twenty thousand slaves for the sake of our luxuries; and destroy or enslave at least double that number of our fellow creatures ;  considering the multitudes we are obliged to murder by sham wars, in order that we may procure them, and consequently draw down by our infamous example the same evil on as many more besides.  Will reason or conscience for a moment submit to it, when the only pretext which can be given is, that we suppose  their  understandings are inferior to ours.  If so, why not pity and protect them till better instructed. But cowards alone take the advantage of fools, supposing the poor Africans to be such.  What then shall we call ourselves,   Christians, or devils, can a race of devils act worse against us than we do against them. And as they have exactly the same right, if they had equal power, to plunder us as we have plundered them; how should we bear it, if a fleet of their ships should hover round our shores, like a set of vultures after their prey.   Would not every principle of self-interested indignation be roused in us.  If then it be admitted that their understandings be weaker  than ours,  yet  I am sure of this,  that in art of wickedness,  as it  relates both  to  our principle  and practice towards them, we abundantly exceed them. Good quality brown leather with nice tooled raised bands, good tight bindings, inscribed Henry Fannces, the gift of his affectionate aunt…. An age to look back on…

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Weight 1107 g