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Original B&W photograph of Charles A. Lindbergh posing with the Spirit of St. Louis 1927, Plus Newspaper Clippings 1937

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£240.00 £220.00

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One nice B&W print of Charles A. Lindbergh posing with the Spirit of St. Louis The notation From original negative taken in 1927 appears in pencil on the back. Mounted on an album page once contained in a newspaper clipping album maintained by the New York City firm Clippings for aviatrix Ruth Nichols. Six obituary notices dated May 11, 1937 about her father appear pasted on the back of the pages 11-12.
Print shows several light creases at the corners and a tear at the left-hand and lower edge, each about one-quarter inch in length. One nice B&W print of Charles A. Lindbergh posing with the Spirit of St. Louis
The notation From original negative taken in 1927 appears in pencil on the back
Mounted on an album page once contained in a newspaper clipping album maintained by the New York City firm Clippings for aviatrix Ruth Nichols. Six obituary notices dated May 11, 1937 about her father appear pasted on the back of the page 11 inches x 15 inches Photograph 8 inches x 10.25 inches.
In 1924, Lindbergh entered a U.S. Army flying school at San Antonio, Texas. He finally was able to see the benefits of studying in achieving his goals. His hard work and dedication paid off when he graduated first in his class the following year. In 1926 he became the first air mail pilot between Chicago, Illinois, and St, Louis, Missouri. While in St. Louis and looking for another challenge, he convinced a group of businessmen to back him in an attempt to win the $25,000 Orteig Prize which had been offered since 1919, by New York hotel businessman Raymond Orteig, for the first non-stop flight between New York and Paris. Lindbergh helped design the monoplane, built by Ryan Airlines, Inc. of San Diego, in which he would make his solo attempt. The plane was named the Spirit of St. Louis.
On his way to New York, Lindbergh established a record for flight time between San Diego and St. Louis of 1,500 miles in 14 hours and 25 minutes. Then, after a stopover, he continued to New York, establishing another record for transcontinental flight time.
On May 20, 1927 at 7:52 a.m., Lindbergh took off from Roosevelt Field on Long Island for Paris, carrying sandwiches, water, maps and charts, and a limited number of other items he deemed absolutely necessary. He decided against carrying a parachute and radio in favour of more gasoline. In his single-engine monoplane, he was an unlikely candidate to succeed in the transatlantic flight as other contenders opted for multi-engine planes and at least one other crew member aboard. He fought fog, icing and drowsiness (he hadnt been able to sleep the night before taking off) during the historic trip. On May 21, 33 1/2 hours later, (10:22 p.m. French time) Lindbergh set the Spirit of St. Louis down at Le Bourget Field near Paris. He had flown over 3,600 miles and became the first to fly solo non-stop across the Atlantic.
Overnight, Lindbergh became an international hero. He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honour and the first-ever Distinguished Flying Cross by the U.S. government, and received high honours from many other countries. He was summoned home to the United States by President Coolidge and returned with the Spirit of St. Louis aboard the navy cruiser U.S.S. Memphis on June 10. After the initial accolades for his accomplishment, Lindbergh made an 82-city U.S. tour in the Spirit of St. Louis to promote the commercialization of aviation, providing Americans throughout the country with the opportunity to express their admiration. Late in 1927, Lindbergh flew to a number of Latin American countries as a goodwill ambassador for the U.S. government. While in Mexico, he met Anne Spencer Morrow, daughter of the American ambassador. The two were married on May 29, 1929 at the Morrow estate in New Jersey. Constantly pursued by the press, the couple could only find privacy in the air. In 1930 Charles taught Anne to fly. She became the first woman in America to earn a glider pilots license an

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Weight 990 g